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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Archived Storm Damage Blog Posts

Hurricane Preparedness

9/9/2019 (Permalink)

Hurricanes are usually accompanied by powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, and coastal and inland flooding, which means that even though we are inland from the ocean, we still need to be prepared.  

How You Can Start Preparing Now:

Know Our Area's Risk of Hurricanes

While the Roanoke area is not at a high risk for hurricanes, we still are susceptible to the storms that result from them.  Heavy rainfall and high winds are both something our area needs to be aware and cautious of.  

Stock Up On The Necessities

It is not uncommon for these larger storms to lead to power outages.  Make sure you are stocked up on water, food, batteries for flashlights, and anything else you may need to feel more comfortable during a power outage.  Keeping your cellphones fully charged as the storm nears is also smart; being able to contact family, friends, and first responders is always important!

Stay Informed

Keep an eye on our local news and weather alerts, for information regarding the storm.  Staying alert for flash flood warnings and strong wind advisories can help keep you and your family safe throughout the storm.

Have a Backup Plan

If your home is in an area prone to flash flooding, have a backup plan!  Call relatives and friends and make a plan to visit a home in a safer location during the storm!

For more information on hurricane preparedness, visit https://www.ready.gov/hurricanes 

You can also check SERVPROprep.com for more ways to keep your home sage

If you find your home has been affected by damage as a result of the storm, call SERVPRO of Roanoke at 540-389-5818, and we will make it, "Like it never even happened."

A storm damaged my house. Now what?!

7/18/2019 (Permalink)

The damage a storm causes to a home can leave your life suddenly upended. In the first days after a storm, you might be overwhelmed with the damage, with everything you have to do and with concerns about getting your life back together. But careful planning can help you return to normalcy as quickly as possible

Take these steps to make life a little easier to get back to normal as soon as possible.

1. Safety First: Avoid power lines, mold, and open areas of murky water. You may need to leave your house until professionals can check it 

2. Document Damage: Take pictures before an impending storm of your home, protect important documents, and when it is safe to enter your home take pics of the damage.

3. Have a plan: If you know a large storm is coming to your area have a plan in place on where you will go, expense plan, and a plan to get back on track.

Rain Rain Go Away!

7/17/2019 (Permalink)

It is important to remember that floods caused by rain can occur anywhere, with floodwaters rising gradually or flash floods striking suddenly. Water's powerful force can easily overtake vehicles and people.

Safety tips for driving in heavy rain:

  • If you must drive in the rain, drive slowly and steadily.  Pull over and stop if it is raining so hard that you cannot see.
  • DO NOT DRIVE THROUGH FLOODWATERS!
  • Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars, causing loss of control or possible stalling.
  • One foot of water will float most vehicles.
  • Two feet of rushing water can sweep away most vehicles — including SUVs and pick-ups.
  • Stay away from water that electrical or power lines have fallen into; electric current passes through water easily.
  • Stay off your cell phone unless you must report severe injuries or call for help.

Safety tips for walking or cycling on urban trails:

  • When rain is falling, it’s best not to walk or bike near a river or stream, even on Denver’s paved urban bike and walking trails; water flow can quickly increase and flooding can occur without notice.
  • Move to higher ground and never go into a culvert! If you are on a streamside trail during a rainstorm use the alternate trail up to street level to avoid underpasses and culverts.
  • NEVER take shelter in a culvert, under a bridge, or in an enclosed space, especially in low elevations by rivers and streams. Always go to higher ground out of the flow of water.
  • Do not walk or bike through moving water. Six inches of moving water can cause a person to fall.
  • If lightning is present, do not stand under or near an isolated tree or group of trees.
  • Never allow children to play around streams, drainage ditches or viaducts, storm drains or flooded areas.

Localized street flooding:

  • In underpasses and some areas that are geographical low-points, water cannot be expected to disappear down the storm inlets instantly; the pace and volume of the rainfall may be too quick and too great to immediately drain off. It takes time for the system to accommodate the rainfall.
  • If you know that your street tends to flood because it is located in a low point, be sure to move your vehicles to higher ground whenever rain is forecast.

Flooded buildings and basements:

Residents with flooded basements or buildings are advised to contact their insurance companies immediately to find out what cleanup and repair work is covered. Other recommended steps include:

  • Turn off the electricity at your building even if the electric company  has turned off the main supply line or power is out. Primary power may be restored when you are not ready.
  • Take pictures/videos and thoroughly document damages, cleanup, and repairs.
  • Open windows and ventilate well.
  • LOOK BEFORE YOU STEP: Floors and stairs can be covered with slippery mud and/or covered with hazardous debris.

Visit this site for more information on rainy storm preparedness:  https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/denver-department-of-public-works/newsroom/2015/rainstorm-safety-tips.html

Dont Let Stormy Weather Ruin your Vacation

7/17/2019 (Permalink)

Hurricane season is June 1 through November 30, peaking in mid-August to late October. Here are traveling and safety tips so storm damage has little to know damage on your vacation.

  • Hurricanes can disrupt flights and you may be separated from your baggage. You can minimize this inconvenience by packing necessities in your carry-on bags. Also, our travel insurance plans can reimburse you if you need to buy necessary items if your bags are delayed more than 12-24 hours, depending on your plan.
  • It's tempting to completely unplug on vacation, but advance warning about hurricanes is not always guaranteed. We recommend you keep up-to-date on the latest information about possible storms before and during your trip.
  • If you're truly concerned about a hurricane impacting your travel plans, consider taking a cruise to your destination as they are more flexible than flights and can detour to alternative ports.

Families or groups traveling together should make an emergency plan to determine where they are going to meet and how they will get there. Additionally, they should check with their accommodation provider to see if they can access an emergency kit with a radio, water, food and other survival basics, if necessary.

Lightening Safety

7/1/2019 (Permalink)

All thunderstorms produce lightning and are dangerous.  However, people can remain safe, as long as they follow some simple guidelines when thunderstorms are in the forecast.

Lightning will often strike outside the area of heavy rain and may strike as far as 10 miles from any rainfall.  A lot of the lightning deaths that occur happen either before the storm before any rain has arrived, or after the storm has appeared to have passed and the rain has ended.

If you can hear the thunder, you are in danger.  Do not be fooled by the clear blue skies.  If you can hear the thunder, that means that lightning is close enough to pose as an immediate threat.

Lightning leaves many of its victims with permanent disabilities.  While only about 10% of lightning victims die, many of the survivors are left with intense pain, neurological disabilities, depressions, and other health problems that stick with them for the rest of their lives.

Visit www.weather.gov/lightning to learn about how you can stay safe during a thunder and lightning storm.

Tornado Safety

7/1/2019 (Permalink)

Tornadoes can destroy buildings, flip cars, and create deadly flying debris. Tornadoes are violently rotating columns of air that extend from a thunderstorm to the ground.

Tornadoes can:

  • Happen anytime and anywhere;
  • Bring intense winds, over 200 MPH; and
  • Look like funnels.

IF YOU ARE UNDER A TORNADO WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • If you can safely get to a sturdy building, then do so immediately.
  • Go to a safe room, basement, or storm cellar.
  • If you are in a building with no basement, then get to a small interior room on the lowest level.
  • Stay away from windows, doors, and outside walls.
  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You’re safer in a low, flat location.
  • Watch out for flying debris that can cause injury or death.
  • Use your arms to protect your head and neck.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A TORNADO THREATENS

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s tornado risk. In the U.S., the Midwest and the Southeast have a greater risk for tornadoes.
  • Know the signs of a tornado, including a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud; an approaching cloud of debris; or a loud roar—similar to a freight train.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts. If your community has sirens, then become familiar with the warning tone.
  • Pay attention to weather reports. Meteorologists can predict when conditions might be right for a tornado.
  • Identify and practice going to a safe shelter in the event of high winds, such as a safe room built using FEMA criteria or a storm shelter built to ICC 500 standards. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room on the lowest level of a sturdy building.
  • Consider constructing your own safe room that meets FEMA or ICC 500 standards.

 Survive DURING

  • Immediately go to a safe location that you identified.
  • Take additional cover by shielding your head and neck with your arms and putting materials such as furniture and blankets around you.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not try to outrun a tornado in a vehicle.
  • If you are in a car or outdoors and cannot get to a building, cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body with a coat or blanket, if possible.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Keep listening to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, and local authorities for updated information.
  • If you are trapped, cover your mouth with a cloth or mask to avoid breathing dust. Try to send a text, bang on a pipe or wall, or use a whistle instead of shouting.
  • Stay clear of fallen power lines or broken utility lines.
  • Do not enter damaged buildings until you are told that they are safe.
  • Save your phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messaging or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear thick-soled shoes, long pants, and work gloves.

 For more information go to : https://www.ready.gov/tornadoes

Are You Prepared if Flooding Occurs?

7/5/2018 (Permalink)

In the event of a flood, do you know your evacuation routes?  How about a place to stay if you must evacuate?  Do you have pets and can they stay with you?  These are all questions we ask in the moment of crisis when we realize we must evacuate due to flooding.

The safest way to survive a flood is to evacuate the area if you are advised to leave.  To ensure that you will be able to act quickly, you need to plan ahead.

Know your community's local flood evacuation plan and identify several escape routes for your location if roads are blocked.

If you will evacuate by car, keep your car fueled and in good condition when there is a flood risk.  Kep emergency supplies and a change of clothes in your car.

If you need to relocate for an extended period of time, identify a place away from home now where you could go if you had to leave.  Consider family or friends who live outside of the local area.

If you expect to go to a shelter after evacuating, download the American Red Cross Shelter Finder app.  This app displays open American Red Cross shelters and provides the capacity and current population of each shelter.

Planning ahead will take some of the stress off in the event of an emergency evacuation.  And remember - TURN AROUND DON"T DROWN - never drive through flood waters.

Storm Response

7/5/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Roanoke specialized in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important.  A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resouces to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Roanoke Valley or surrounding area's, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster.  We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,700 Franchises around the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage?  Call Us Today at 540-389-5818 for 24/7 Emergency Service!

let SERVPRO make it, "Like it never even happened."

Flood Preparedness Tips

7/5/2018 (Permalink)

These tips were provided by FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) to help you prepare your home or business for a flood.

Before the Flood:

  • Have a qualified professional elevate the furnace, water heater, and electric panel is susceptible to flooding.
  • Install "check valves" in sewer traps to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home or business.
  • Seal walls in basements with waterproofing compounds to help avoid seepage.

During the Flood:

  • Turn off all utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so.
  • Disconnect electrical appliances.
  • Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Do not walk through moving water.  Even six inches or moving water can make you fall.

After the Flood:

  • Listen for news reports to learn if the community's water supply is safe to drink.
  • Avoid floodwaters.  Water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.  Water may also be electrically charged.
  • Stay out of any building if it is surrounded by floodwaters.
  • Return home only when authorities indicate it is safe.

If you do find yourself in a situation where your home has been affected by flood damage, Call SERVPRO of Roanoke to make it, "Like it never even happened."

How to Stay Safe During a Thunder and Lighting Storm

6/27/2018 (Permalink)

We are no stranger to thunder and lightning storms here in Virginia, but the harsh danger that lurks behind them is unknown to many of us.

Local U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 22,600 fires per year that were started by lightning (www.iii.org)

These fires can cause a lot of damage and can put the lives of your family in danger.

The use of lightning rods as well as the accompanying protection system are designed to protect a home or building from a direct strike of lightning, as well as a lightning-initiated fire.  These systems work by intercepting the lightning strike and providing it with a conductive path for the harmful electrical discharge to flow through directly into the ground.  For more information on lightning rods and lightning protection systems, you can visit https://www.weather.gov/safety/lightning-rods .

If your home is not equipped with a lightning-protection system, here are tips on how you can stay safe inside your home throughout a lightning storm provided by weather.gov.  

  • Stick to your cellular and cordless phones.  Do not use any phones that are connected by a cord!
  • Do not touch electrical equipment throughout the storm.  This can include computers, TVs, or cords, however, you CAN use remote controls safely.
  • Avoid plumbing as much as possible.  Do not wash your hands, take a shower, or wash your dishes throughout the storm
  • Do not lie on concrete floors or lean against concrete walls
  • Protect your pets!  Dog houses are not a safe shelter during there storms, and dogs that are chained to trees or on a metal runner are particularly vulnerable to lightning strikes
  • Protect your property!  Lightning will generate electric surges that can damage electronic equipment even from some distance from the actual strike.  Typical surge protectors will not protect your equipment from a strike of lightning.  Do not unplug equipment during a thunderstorm, for there is a risk you could be struck!

Storm Damage?

11/27/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Roanoke specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.  Our teams are trained and qualified to assist you in any disaster.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Roanoke Valley we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,700 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call SERVPRO of Roanoke

What to look for after a Hail Storm

7/5/2017 (Permalink)

Do you have hail damage?  It is not that easy a question to answer. If your building has asphalt shingles or a metal roof, you may see dents. But, on a built-up (tar & gravel) roof, you might see few to no visible signs of damage. 
When do you need professional help? Three Helpful Indicators:

Hail comes in many sizes and densities, so it can be difficult to know when you actually need to be concerned about damage. Whether you’re staring at pea-sized hail on the ground or golf-ball size hail, here are some signs that indicate it would be a good idea to at least talk to a professional:

  • Damaged vehicles—If the roofs of nearby cars were dented, then there’s a good chance your building also sustained hail damage.
  • Damaged siding, downspouts or windows—If you are unable to safely inspect your roof, hail damage to other parts of your building, such as dented downspouts or siding, can be a good indicator you may need to take action.
  • Work on neighboring properties—If a neighboring building sustained hail damage and is being repaired, it’s a sign you should more closely inspect your roof and building. 

Storm Damage

11/8/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Roanoke specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.  Our teams are trained and qualified to assist you in any disaster.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Roanoke Valley, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today SERVPRO of Roanoke  540-389-5818

When Storms or Floods hit the Roanoke or New River Valley SERVPRO is ready!

5/24/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Roanoke, Montgomery & Pulaski Counties specialize in Storm or Flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to pre-storm condition, "Like it never even happened".

FASTER RESPONSE

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important.  A faster response lessens the damage, limits further damage and reduces the restoration cost.  

RESOURCES TO HANDLE FLOODS & STORMS

When storms hit our area we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster.  We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1650 franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

If you are faced with storm or flood damage, call us today!

SERVPRO of Roanoke, Montgomery & Pulaski Co.  540-389-5818

FASTER TO ANY SIZE DISASTER!